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Re: Cafe menu

Postby NAR » February 2nd, 2009, 2:02 am

I have 3 grass-fed steaks sitting in the freezer. They've been there for about 6 months.

Anyway went to a Turkish cooking class today. Was interviewed by TRT, big Turkish TV station. The hostess was gorgeous (looked EA) and she's famous in Turkey. I heard this channel is also seen in Iran. OMG I hope I don't get onto the cutting room floor. I want global exposure so I can add my videos to the Eurasian star thread. :lol:

Here's what we learned to cook.

Kisir (bulgher wheat, parsely, onions,cucumbers, pepper or tomato paste, olive oil, spices)
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Borek (feta cheese, parsley, dill)
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Here's the blog with recipes too!!!!
http://www.istanbulturkishcookingclass.blogspot.com/
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Re: Cafe menu

Postby bluemarlin » February 2nd, 2009, 3:54 am

Oh no, i think the life cycle of meat stored in the freezer is 6 months after that it's no good. I still have ground moose that I need to cook and I'm hoping to make something similar to swedish meatballs with the dressing except it's gonna be called mooseballs :lol:

^ the bulgher wheat is also used in Sicily right, coz I watched the Lydia show where in she prepared it from the scratch.
It looks yummy and healthy. Those kinds of grains, like couscous and bulgher are sold in a package in grocery stores aright and you only add the necessary ingredients. Do you also add safron in it?
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Re: Cafe menu

Postby NAR » February 4th, 2009, 1:20 am

Okay, I'm thawing my steaks in the fridge. :P I guess Bulgur wheat is pan-Meditteranean but I always associated it with Mid-EAst cooking. The Turkish cooking class teaches a lot of vegetarian cooking.

I got a recipe for poisson cru, a Tahitian dish that is also enjoyed in Fiji (kokanda). First tried this dish at Fishmonger deli in Parnell, Auckland NZ. I'd eat there as much as I could. :mrgreen: It's basically a fish ceviche with coconut cream. I'll try to make it this weekend if I've finished up the grass-fed beef steaks.

Fishmonger website
http://www.thefishmonger.co.nz

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Re: Cafe menu

Postby bluemarlin » February 4th, 2009, 1:32 am

What's your camera NAR? your pictures look so sharp and crisp.
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Re: Cafe menu

Postby bluemarlin » February 5th, 2009, 1:47 am

Swedish meatballs are out, Canadian mooseballs are in :lol:
It took me some time to cook this. The longest part was preparing the moose balls.

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It tastes like the stuff being sold at Ikea. yum!

Moose is a member of the deer family. It's alternatively called as elk in the UK. Moose meat is all lean.
Last edited by bluemarlin on February 19th, 2009, 2:29 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Cafe menu

Postby NAR » February 5th, 2009, 4:11 pm

It does look yummy. I love Swedish meatballs so why not mooseballs. Those pics aren't from my camera but the web. Anyway I have a Canon of sorts. The photos from the travel section are from that camera.
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Re: Cafe menu

Postby NAR » February 6th, 2009, 11:46 pm

Had my Halo-Halo fix today. :P
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Re: Cafe menu

Postby Cristobal » February 7th, 2009, 7:11 am

Champorado. It's chocolate mixed with rice.

Rice and chocolate? That's so clever 8-)


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Re: Cafe menu

Postby NAR » February 8th, 2009, 8:25 pm

Mexican Champurrado write-up on wiki
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champurrado

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Excerpt from http://xoomer.virgilio.it/chocolate_sto ... rrado.html website

"Morning comfort / From Irish oatmeal to Chinese congee to Mexican champurrado, every cuisine offers steaming bowls of cereal to stave off winter's chill

. Spaniards added sugar, milk and chocolate to the original Aztec recipe, McMahan says, producing atole de chocolate or champurrado.
. It's popular enough that instant champurrado is now available in supermarkets.
. "Champurrado is primarily served with celebratory meals and tamales, " McMahan says, "though it is (also) a comfort food in the morning, served with spicy things or given to kids to drink." Spanish influence in the Philippines created a cuisine crossover -- Filipino champurado (with one "r") is made with sweet rice instead of masa harina. (hominy flour)
. Champurrado is often served with celebratory meals and can be an acquired taste.
. Once the champurrado has begun to slightly thicken, after about 10 minutes, add the chocolate, cinnamon and vanilla bean.
. The tiny granules of corn will take about 20 minutes to swell and thicken, and suddenly the champurrado will become smooth and velvety thick."
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Re: Cafe menu

Postby NAR » February 17th, 2009, 4:38 am

There's a Southeast Asian food court where I live. It's mainly Vietnamese with a Pho vendor, bakery, bahn mi stand, Viet/Thai, chinese-Viet, Indonesian-Malaysian, and most recently Pinoy food. Unfortunately the Pinoy food isn't good. There is a very sour shrimp soup and most dishes tend to be salty. I've heard from non-Pinoys that Pinoy food tend to be too salty. In order to compete in this food court, the Pinoy stand needs to Americanize a bit because I spoke with some gringos and Mexicans who also share my sentiments on the food being too salty and sour. The rest of the food court has excellent food and yes, I've tried every vendor and sadly the Pinoy vendor doesn't make my taste-bud cut. :(
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